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EVENTS

All curious community members are welcome, whether or not you're part of the Wisdom Exchange Project!

Speaker: Shauna Bowes, M.A. from Emory University

Date: Wednesday, February 8th from 10am-11am EST

This talk will introduce and define intellectual humility. Results will be presented from three studies showing that intellectual humility is related to less political polarization and misinformation susceptibility. That is, intellectual humility may help people to not disparage political outgroup members, hold extreme political views, and turn to false information in times of uncertainty. In sum, intellectual humility is a compelling vehicle for understanding when, why, and how people form and hold certain beliefs over others.

 

Shauna is a sixth-year Ph.D. student in Emory University’s clinical psychology doctoral program. She worked with the late Dr. Scott Lilienfeld and currently work with Dr. Arber Tasimi (Morality and Development Lab). Broadly, she is interested in how personality intersects with beliefs. Specifically, she focuses on intellectual humility and its potential implications for political polarization and misinformation susceptibility. In the long-term, she hopes to understand the building blocks of irrational thinking and leverage intervention science to help people make changes in their beliefs.

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WEP Seminar #15

Date:

Wednesday, February 8th from 10am-11am ET

 

Speaker:

Shauna Bowes, Emory University

This talk will introduce and define intellectual humility. Results will be presented from three studies showing that intellectual humility is related to less political polarization and misinformation susceptibility. That is, intellectual humility may help people to not disparage political outgroup members, hold extreme political views, and turn to false information in times of uncertainty. In sum, intellectual humility is a compelling vehicle for understanding when, why, and how people form and hold certain beliefs over others.
Shauna is a sixth-year Ph.D. student in Emory University’s clinical psychology doctoral program. She worked with the late Dr. Scott Lilienfeld and currently work with Dr. Arber Tasimi (Morality and Development Lab). Broadly, she is interested in how personality intersects with beliefs. Specifically, she focuses on intellectual humility and its potential implications for political polarization and misinformation susceptibility. In the long-term, she hopes to understand the building blocks of irrational thinking and leverage intervention science to help people make changes in their beliefs.

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Image by Morgan Housel

WEP Seminar #14

Date:

January 19th 2022 at 4:00 PM EST

 

Speaker:

Erin Matsuba, Syracuse University

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder defined by challenges with social communication and repetitive behaviours. Children with autism are often assumed to perform worse than neurotypical children across all domains. However, emerging evidence suggests that autistic children may have enhanced auditory perception, as their brain’s respond faster to sounds in their environment. This advantage in processing sounds may translate to other skills, such as music or languages, and points towards children with autism being different, not necessarily deficient.

Erin is a doctoral candidate in School Psychology with a concentration in Neuroscience at Syracuse University.

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WEP Seminar #13

Date:

October 26th, 2022

Speaker:

Dr. Raheleh Saryazdi, KITE-Toronto Rehabilitation

Every day we engage in spoken conversations with family, friends, colleagues, and sometimes even strangers. Communicating with others and staying connected has benefits that go beyond the exchange of information, benefits that directly affect our well-being. However, the ability to communicate and the quality of communication changes as we age and technology is changing the ways we communicate. In my research, I have been exploring ways to enhance communication in older adults, particularly through the latest technologies. In one line of research, I focus on factors that influence effective communication between older adults and social robots, as these agents are currently being developed to provide companionship and assistance. In another line of research, I study whether we could use virtual reality to elicit and enhance conversations between persons with dementia and their family caregivers, in turn improving their connectedness and quality of life. Together, the goal of these studies is to inform the design of future technologies and contribute to promoting positive and successful communication in older adults.Dr. Raheleh Saryazdi is a postdoctoral researcher at KITE-Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network working with Dr. Jennifer Campos. She is also a trainee at the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA-Team 17).  She received her PhD in Psychology in the Perception, Cognition, and Cognitive Neuroscience stream at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Dr. Craig Chambers.

ALL EVENTS

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WEP Seminar #12

Date:

August 23rd, 2022

Speaker:

Maria Borto, Trento University

Maria Bortot is a PhD student at CIMeC (University of Trento), under the supervision of Prof. Giorgio Vallortigara. In 2018 she obtained a master’s degree in Neuroscience and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation at the University of Padua with a final dissertation on the spontaneous use of absolute numerical rules in honeybees, based on the experiments conducted at the CRCA (Research Centre on Animal Cognition, University of Toulouse, France). In 2019, she obtained a research assistant position at the Animal Cognition Lab (CIMeC) to study the numerical abilities of bees. Using a behavioural perspective, she is currently investigating bees’ numerical and more general cognitive capacities. She is also studying different behavioural states, such as sleeping behaviour, investigating their possible links with bees’ learning and memory capacity.

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WEP Seminar #11

Date:

July 28th, 2022

Speaker:

Isabelle Arseneau-Bruneau,  McGill University.

Isabelle Arseneau-Bruneau is a doctoral researcher in Neuroscience at McGill University - Montreal Neurological Institute. She works under the supervision of Robert Zatorre and aims to better understand how playing musical instruments may help enhance our brain functions and auditory perception. Her research examines how the quality of auditory processing is modified when the sounds we perceive are generated by movements (such as when we play an instrument). Better knowledge of these mechanisms will help orient interventions in the clinic and educational environments. Her research is supported by the Fonds Québécois de Recherche en Santé (FQRS). Before her studies at McGill, Isabelle completed a Master's in Music & Human Learning at the University of Texas at Austin (2017) and worked as a research assistant at the SoundBrain (Chandrasekaran) Lab. She is also a professional musician, classically trained on the trumpet. She earned Music degrees from the Conservatoires de musique et d'art dramatique du Québec (2009), Laval University (2015), and pursued graduate studies in performance at The Glenn Gould School of the Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto (2009–2010). 

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WEP Seminar #10

Date:

June 9th, 2022

 

Speaker:

Nicole Gervais, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

By acknowledging the importance of biological sex (whether someone is male or female), medical research has made life-saving discoveries identifying different symptom profiles and treatment responses between men and women for conditions like heart attack and stroke. While neuroscience research still lags behind, we are learning that brain aging in women is different than in men, due in part to female-specific factors, like menopause. Lifestyle factors affecting brain aging are also influenced by biological sex, including sleep. In her talk, Nicole will summarize her recent research relating to the effects of early hormone loss on sleep, cognition, and brain structure. She will also discuss what implications this work has for brain aging, and whether interventions exist that might help women age better. 

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WEP Seminar #09

Date:

February 17th, 2022

 

Speakers:

Magdelena Samulski, Trent University

Refilwe Mpai, McGill University

We are featuring a lineup of Wisdom Exchange Project Volunteers who will each be giving a short 15 minute showcase of their research, with opportunities to engage with studies for a discussion and Q&A period. 

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WEP Seminar #08

Date:

January 24, 2022

 

Speakers:

Sarah Campbell, Trent University

Noah Khan, York University

Natalie Slavat, X University

We are featuring a lineup of Wisdom Exchange Project Volunteers who will each be giving a short 15 minute showcase of their research, with opportunities to engage with studies for a discussion and Q&A period. 

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WEP Seminar #07

Date:

November 12, 2021

 

Speaker:

Dr. Mehrdad Golian

Dr. Mehrdad Golian, MD, is a cardiologist and invasive electrophysiologist at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. He completed his medical school training, internal medicine residencies and cardiology residencies at the University of Manitoba. Subsequently, Dr. Golian completed his fellowship training in electrophysiology at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto where he was highly regarded for his clinical and EP skills, as well as caring interactions with patients and staff. He completed a Master of Science in Healthcare Quality and patient Safety at Queen's University. He is currently the Deputy Quality Officer at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and the Director of the Atrial Fibrillation Clinic.

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WEP Seminar #06

Date:

October 7, 2021

Speaker:

Dr. Julie Chabot,

Geriatrician, St. Mary's Hospital Center

Before starting her medical studies, Dr. Chabot was a classical singer. In 2016, she launched the MUSIC Project, which combines her two passions: music and geriatrics. For her master's degree in psychology, she studied the effects of music on the health of hospitalized geriatric patients. In her presentation, Dr. Chabot will present a summary of the evidence for the use of music in hospitals; especially on pain and anxiety control. She will also present the results of the study she led evaluating the effects of music on the mood of geriatric patients admitted to St. Mary's Hospital

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WEP Seminar #05

Date:

September 22, 2021

 

Speaker:

Dr. Sam Biglieri,

Assistant Professor, Ryerson University
 

There has been a call to expand research on people living with dementia (PLWD) from health and social sectors to urban planning. The World Health Organization projects the number of PLWD to increase from 47 to 132 million worldwide by 2050, with 60-80% of PLWD residing within the community (as opposed to congregate living settings). For PLWD, being supported by their neighbourhoods in terms of access has many benefits: more social interaction, sense of worth, dignity, and improved physical/mental health. Being able to access your neighbourhood is a right, and for PLWD – this makes it integral to investigate how neighbourhoods influence their mobility and access. This seminar discusses how the design of suburban neighbourhoods impacts the ability of people living with dementia to get around based on research done in Waterloo, Canada, and what can be done to make city planning dementia-inclusive.

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WEP Seminar #04

Date:

August 13, 2021

 

Speaker:

Jamie Snytte,

Clinical Psychology Student, McGill University
 

Aging comes with changes in many of the ways we perceive the world, act and go through our lives. Our cognitive processes, the way we think, remember and make decisions, also tend to fluctuate as we get older. Jamie's talk will focus on specific parts of the brain, within an area called the medial temporal lobes, that supports episodic memory. Some of these brain regions get smaller as we age, but our brains are plastic enough to compensate for these structural changes. While some regions shrink, other regions can work harder to maintain our memory abilities.

Serious Conversation

WEP Seminar #03

Date:

July 15, 2021

Speakers:

Dr. Floris Van Vugt

Rhona Achtman

 

In this session, we will explore how people can connect across generations. The session will be held by Floris Van Vugt, who is starting his career as a university professor, and Rhona Achtman, who is a retired physiotherapist. Both are actively practicing Authentic Relating.

We will share our thoughts, experiences and challenges, and based on these, we offer a number of interactive exercises that all are invited to participate in.

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WEP Seminar #02

Date:

May 18, 2021

Speaker:

Sivaniya Subramaniapilai

This event is a joint collaboration between the Wisdom Exchange Project and McGill University Research Centre for Studies in Aging. Sivaniya Subramaniapillai will present her doctoral research on the role of protective lifestyle and social factors in promoting healthy living and the importance of investigating individual differences, such as sex/gender, for an individualized approach to healthy living. Make sure to tune in to have a lively discussion about the important role that individual differences and our environment have in shaping our cognitive health!

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WEP Seminar #01

Date: April 15th, 2021

Speaker: Danielle D'Amico

Danielle D'Amico is a PhD student at X University in Psychological Science and one of the coordinators behind WEP. She will be presenting her research on the effects of stress on cognitive health, and how engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviours (like healthy eating, exercise, social engagement, sleep, and mindfulness practices) may be able to mitigate the harmful impacts of stress on the brain.

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